Discussion:
Newbie video problems
Hal Davis
2007-12-02 21:10:44 UTC
Permalink
I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.

First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.

Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.

Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.

Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?

Thanks,

Hal Davis
James Takac
2007-12-02 22:46:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hal Davis
I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.
Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.
Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
Thanks,
Hal Davis
Hi Hal

Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to use
the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you resized
the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot menu. Just
use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter to select

As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look up
the specs online

Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you to
log in at that prompt first time you enter it

You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail

You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed the
default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate

James
Hal Davis
2007-12-02 23:04:20 UTC
Permalink
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James Takac
2007-12-02 23:53:07 UTC
Permalink
Hi Hal
James,
Thanks for taking the time.
I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
partition.
I'm guessing that was 8 gb not 8 mb
When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
menu.
Strange. Would expect a menu with a choice between Ubuntu and Windows at this
point. Will work this part out after we get your screen back
When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what? happens when I
reboot without the CD in.
When you boot with the cd in you're essentially running Ubuntu directly off
the cd, not your hd. It's a live cd so you can run/try it without installing
first.
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.
Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
mode.

Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
it wont echo the password, that's normal

next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
idintified. You should see something resembling the following

Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection

What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.

Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
back what they say as well

At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration

When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
changes to take effect for now

Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
settings, but it's widescreen and 17".
So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
settings I should pick from the menu?
That would be recovery mode but you're not getting a grub menu to select that
so not sure how to without that
Thanks so much.
Hal Davis
Hope I can be of help. Someonelse will likely chime in soon enough

James
I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.
Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.
Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
Thanks,
Hal Davis
Hi Hal
Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
to select
As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
up the specs online
Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
to log in at that prompt first time you enter it
You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail
You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate
James
--
Mankind and religion are like prism and light. The word of God passes through
the prism of Man and seperates into the various colours we call religions.

Penndragon.
andy baxter
2007-12-03 00:06:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Takac
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.
Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or wrong
mode.
Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry that
it wont echo the password, that's normal
next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be asked
for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic card
idintified. You should see something resembling the following
Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection
What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to report
back what they say as well
At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration
When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit back
to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system for
changes to take effect for now
Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.

I.e.:

get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
type:
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
then type:
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.

You need to type:
/etc/init.d/gdm restart

to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.
James Takac
2007-12-03 00:36:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by andy baxter
Post by James Takac
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another
half username box.
Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or
wrong mode.
Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry
that it wont echo the password, that's normal
next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be
asked for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic
card idintified. You should see something resembling the following
Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection
What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to
report back what they say as well
At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just
to get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d
support or "nv" for 2d acceleration
When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit
back to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the
system for changes to take effect for now
Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.
get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.
/etc/init.d/gdm restart
to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.
Hi Andy

You forgot to stop the gdm with
/etc/init.d/gdm stop
before restarting it

However good point that it may well be easier for him as a newbie. Hell, I'm
no expert myself ;)

James
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 01:14:34 UTC
Permalink
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James Takac
2007-12-03 01:48:54 UTC
Permalink
Andy, James,
After trying Andy's suggestion, and fumbling and guessing my way through a
large number of things, I now have Ubuntu up and running in low graphics
mode.
I think I know what graphics adaptor to tell it to use, but I don't know
what to tell it about my monitor. Looking at the HP tech support web site,
it's not at all clear which monitor was installed on my laptop. Do I just
guess-and-test until something works?
Thanks,
Hal
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.
Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or
wrong mode.
Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry
that it wont echo the password, that's normal
next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be
asked for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic
card idintified. You should see something resembling the following
Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection
What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to
report back what they say as well
At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration
When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit
back to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system
for changes to take effect for now
Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.
get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.
/etc/init.d/gdm restart
to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.
Hi Al

This is where the envy script at the page I pointed to should get your card up
and going with any luck. install the deb package at

http://albertomilone.com/ubuntu/nvidia/scripts/ubuntu/envy_0.9.9-0ubuntu1_all.deb

then go thru Applications -> System Tools -> Envy

that will install it. If it finds a ready installed one it will prompt you to
uninstall it before carrying on

James
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 02:07:41 UTC
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James Takac
2007-12-03 02:58:31 UTC
Permalink
Got the graphical mode up and running in low-res, and nothing I change in
the video settings "sticks". I pick something, test it, select it, and then
go back into the settings and it's back on generic.
And while I can load Firefox, it doesn't see the internet anymore, so I
don't see how I can execute the command you gave me, especially since I
haven't a clue how to do internet access from a command line.
Hi Hal

What type of connection do you have, i.e. dialup or dsl or cable? Does the
icon resembling 2 computer screens show near the time? If so and you're using
dsl or better try right clicking it and disable networking. Then repeat and
reenable it. Sometimes that's enough to get it going again. Otherwise enter a
terminal Applications -> Accessories-> Terminal will suffice. See if you can
ping a known website, e.g. "ping www.google.com" without the quotes as an
example. If successful you should see a series of lines like this

64 bytes from cf-in-f103.google.com (74.125.19.103): icmp_seq=10 ttl=241
time=205 ms

Use CTRL-C to stop it when done

You could also try rebooting the laptop to see if networking recovers or even
reboot (turn off and on if need) your modem if dsl.

Also does your mail prog get the mail on that system? If so your firefox
settings may be off. Usually set to direct connection and you can check that
via edit -> preferences -> network -> settings in firefox

If this hasn't helped, then the following site in the ubuntu documentation may
be of help

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/InternetHowto

James
I guess I need to find a local geek squad equivalent who is versed in
Ubuntu, and pay him/her to fix my system while I watch and learn. I'm in
Plano, Texas. Anybody have thoughts?
Hal Davis
Andy, James,
After trying Andy's suggestion, and fumbling and guessing my way through a
large number of things, I now have Ubuntu up and running in low graphics
mode.
I think I know what graphics adaptor to tell it to use, but I don't know
what to tell it about my monitor. Looking at the HP tech support web site,
it's not at all clear which monitor was installed on my laptop. Do I just
guess-and-test until something works?
Thanks,
Hal
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.
Ok, sounds like the driver have been switched to either the wrong one or
wrong mode.
Use CTRL-ALT-F1 to get a console. You'll have to login there. Don't worry
that it wont echo the password, that's normal
next type "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf" without the quotes. You'll be
asked for your password again. Scroll down to where you see the graphic
card idintified. You should see something resembling the following
Section "Device"
Identifier "Generic Video Card"
Driver "nv"
Busid "PCI:1:0:0"
Option "AddARGBVisuals" "True"
Option "AddARGBGLXVisuals" "True"
Option "NoLogo" "True"
EndSection
What does yours list there? Take note more so of the driver here.
Below that will be the monitor and default screnn areas. Might help to
report back what they say as well
At the very worst, where mine says "nv" can be replaced with "vesa" just to
get a working screen. For nvidia cards it's usually "nvidia" for 3d support
or "nv" for 2d acceleration
When making a change use CTRL-O to write back to disk. CTRL-X will exit
back to the prompt at which you can type "sudo reboot" to reboot the system
for changes to take effect for now
Do you recall exactly what you did before things went awry?
I was going to suggest exactly the same thing, but realised you can do
the same thing in a way that may be easier for a new user by running
dpkg-reconfigure.
get a terminal using ctrl-alt-f1
log in as a normal user.
sudo -i
and type your user's password to become root.
dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg
This will start a text mode menu system which lets you reconfigure the
graphics card. If you say yes whenever it asks you to autodetect
something, and choose the selected option the rest of the time, you
should get a working configuration. If not, try setting the driver to
'vesa' instead of (probably) 'nv' when that option comes up.
/etc/init.d/gdm restart
to restart the graphics system (x server) after you've changed the
configuration. You shouldn't need to reboot.
Hi Al
This is where the envy script at the page I pointed to should get your card
up and going with any luck. install the deb package at
http://albertomilone.com/ubuntu/nvidia/scripts/ubuntu/envy_0.9.9-0ubuntu1_a
ll.deb
then go thru Applications -> System Tools -> Envy
that will install it. If it finds a ready installed one it will prompt you
to uninstall it before carrying on
James
--
Be the change you want to see in the world.

Mahatma Gandh
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 03:41:10 UTC
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James Takac
2007-12-03 07:59:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Takac
Hi Al
This is where the envy script at the page I pointed to should get your card
up and going with any luck. install the deb package at
http://albertomilone.com/ubuntu/nvidia/scripts/ubuntu/envy_0.9.9-0ubuntu1_a
ll.deb
then go thru Applications -> System Tools -> Envy
that will install it. If it finds a ready installed one it will prompt you
to uninstall it before carrying on
James
Well, I went there, and downloaded the package, and tried to install it,
but I get the message "Please insert 'Ubuntu 7.10_Gutsy Gibbon_-Release
i386 (20071016)' into the drive '/cdrom/'
I have no clue what it's asking for.
Hal
Hi Hal

It's asking for your install cd though it's not needed. Go thru System ->
Administration -> Software Sources and uncheck the cdrom option at the
bottom. It wont ask for the cd anymore

James
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 03:47:01 UTC
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andy baxter
2007-12-03 06:10:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Takac
Got the graphical mode up and running in low-res, and nothing I change in
the video settings "sticks". I pick something, test it, select it, and then
go back into the settings and it's back on generic.
And while I can load Firefox, it doesn't see the internet anymore, so I
don't see how I can execute the command you gave me, especially since I
haven't a clue how to do internet access from a command line.
Hi Hal
What type of connection do you have, i.e. dialup or dsl or cable? Does the
icon resembling 2 computer screens show near the time? If so and you're using
dsl or better try right clicking it and disable networking. Then repeat and
reenable it. Sometimes that's enough to get it going again. Otherwise enter a
terminal Applications -> Accessories-> Terminal will suffice.
Whoops. Realized why I wasn't seeing the internet. I had moved my
laptop in where my home desktop is, so I could check this email and
work on the laptop without moving 3 rooms away. I forgot that the
laptop was using a wired network, and I hadn't set it up for wireless.
It wasn't seeing the internet because I hadn't plugged in the ethernet
cable. Doh.
But, to answer your question, I have FIOS at home. I'm getting good
internet on the laptop when I actually plug in the cable.
Not getting email on the laptop. I get all my email on my office
computer, and I used gotomypc.com from other computers to check the
email at the office.
Right now that's not an effective solution with my laptop stuck on
generic resolution, showing only about a quarter of what should be
onscreen. So, it would be quite clumsy to try to use gotomypc.com to
look at the office computer from my laptop.
[ 90.000000] bcm43xx: Error: Microcode "bcm43xx_microcode4.fw" not
available or load failed.
Can anyone tell me what that's about, and what to do about it? And is
it related to my inability to make video setting changes "stick"?
Hal Davis
I just did a quick check on google (googled bcm43xx linux), and bcm43xx
is a driver for your wireless card, so not directly connected to your
video problems. The message is saying (I think) that the driver can't
load a file containing the firmware for the card. But I'm not sure why
it needs to do this - maybe someone else can help.

see http://linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers/b43

for some more clues.
James Takac
2007-12-03 08:05:18 UTC
Permalink
Got the graphical mode up and running in low-res, and nothing I change in
the video settings "sticks". I pick something, test it, select it, and then
go back into the settings and it's back on generic.
And while I can load Firefox, it doesn't see the internet anymore, so I
don't see how I can execute the command you gave me, especially since I
haven't a clue how to do internet access from a command line.
Hi Hal
What type of connection do you have, i.e. dialup or dsl or cable? Does the
icon resembling 2 computer screens show near the time? If so and you're
using dsl or better try right clicking it and disable networking. Then
repeat and reenable it. Sometimes that's enough to get it going again.
Otherwise enter a terminal Applications -> Accessories-> Terminal will
suffice.
Whoops. Realized why I wasn't seeing the internet. I had moved my laptop
in where my home desktop is, so I could check this email and work on the
laptop without moving 3 rooms away. I forgot that the laptop was using a
wired network, and I hadn't set it up for wireless. It wasn't seeing the
internet because I hadn't plugged in the ethernet cable. Doh.
But, to answer your question, I have FIOS at home. I'm getting good
internet on the laptop when I actually plug in the cable.
Not getting email on the laptop. I get all my email on my office computer,
and I used gotomypc.com from other computers to check the email at the
office.
Right now that's not an effective solution with my laptop stuck on generic
resolution, showing only about a quarter of what should be onscreen. So, it
would be quite clumsy to try to use gotomypc.com to look at the office
computer from my laptop.
[?? 90.000000] bcm43xx: Error: Microcode "bcm43xx_microcode4.fw" not
available or load failed.
Can anyone tell me what that's about, and what to do about it? And is it
related to my inability to make video setting changes "stick"?
Hal Davis
Hi Hal

From what I gather that error is re your wireless adaptor. Did a quick search
via google with

http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=com.ubuntu%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs=tVl&q=bcm43xx%3A+Error%3A+Microcode+bcm43xx_microcode4.fw+not+available+or+load+failed&btnG=Search&meta=

Hopefully something in there will help on that side

James
andy baxter
2007-12-03 06:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Got the graphical mode up and running in low-res, and nothing I change
in the video settings "sticks". I pick something, test it, select it,
and then go back into the settings and it's back on generic.
And while I can load Firefox, it doesn't see the internet anymore, so
I don't see how I can execute the command you gave me, especially
since I haven't a clue how to do internet access from a command line.
I guess I need to find a local geek squad equivalent who is versed in
Ubuntu, and pay him/her to fix my system while I watch and learn. I'm
in Plano, Texas. Anybody have thoughts?
Hal Davis
How are you changing the video settings? Using dpkg-reconfigure or using
a graphical tool from the desktop?

Have you tried choosing 'nv' as your graphics driver yet (in
dpkg-reconfigure) instead of vesa? Vesa is a special mode which all
graphics cards support to allow cross-compatibility, but doesn't support
higher resolutions than 800x600 I think. So to get the best from your
laptop you're going to have to try to find the right driver. You can get
the monitor settings set right (on my laptop at least) by telling
dpkg-reconfigure to autodetect the monitor, and then keeping the options
following that the same.


andy.
Shawn McCuan
2007-12-03 06:23:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by andy baxter
Vesa is a special mode which all
graphics cards support to allow cross-compatibility, but doesn't support
higher resolutions than 800x600 I think.
Vesa supports higher resolutions than 800x600. My laptop used 1024x768 -
so i know it at least supports that :)
--
Shawn McCuan
smccuan at gmail.com

Support a national vote in the US!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Popular_Vote_Interstate_Compact
http://www.nationalpopularvote.com
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andy baxter
2007-12-03 06:30:15 UTC
Permalink
OK, sorry.
Post by andy baxter
Vesa is a special mode which all
graphics cards support to allow cross-compatibility, but doesn't support
higher resolutions than 800x600 I think.
Vesa supports higher resolutions than 800x600. My laptop used 1024x768
- so i know it at least supports that :)
--
Shawn McCuan
smccuan at gmail.com <mailto:smccuan at gmail.com>
Support a national vote in the US!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Popular_Vote_Interstate_Compact
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Popular_Vote_Interstate_Compact>
http://www.nationalpopularvote.com
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 17:25:57 UTC
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James Takac
2007-12-03 22:21:52 UTC
Permalink
I've been selecting the video selections from the graphical interface.
I'll test them first, they look fine, and I say OK, but they don't take,
even after a reboot.
Hal
Hi Hal

Some quick googling found this for you

http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=550433

Might be of help

James
andy baxter
2007-12-04 06:46:09 UTC
Permalink
Try going through the dpkg-reconfigure process again, and make sure you
have selected all the resolutions you want to be able to use in that.
There is a page where you can choose which resolutions to enable out of
a long list, so make sure 1024x768 (and above??) are selected in that
list. Also, when it asks you to autodetect the monitor, say yes, and
then leave the pages after that as they are.

You could also try sending us a copy of the file /etc/X11/xorg.conf if
you can get email working on your computer.

andy.
I've been selecting the video selections from the graphical interface.
I'll test them first, they look fine, and I say OK, but they don't
take, even after a reboot.
Hal
Post by andy baxter
Got the graphical mode up and running in low-res, and nothing I change
in the video settings "sticks". I pick something, test it, select it,
and then go back into the settings and it's back on generic.
And while I can load Firefox, it doesn't see the internet anymore, so
I don't see how I can execute the command you gave me, especially
since I haven't a clue how to do internet access from a command line.
I guess I need to find a local geek squad equivalent who is versed in
Ubuntu, and pay him/her to fix my system while I watch and learn. I'm
in Plano, Texas. Anybody have thoughts?
Hal Davis
How are you changing the video settings? Using dpkg-reconfigure or using
a graphical tool from the desktop?
Have you tried choosing 'nv' as your graphics driver yet (in
dpkg-reconfigure) instead of vesa? Vesa is a special mode which all
graphics cards support to allow cross-compatibility, but doesn't support
higher resolutions than 800x600 I think. So to get the best from your
laptop you're going to have to try to find the right driver. You can get
the monitor settings set right (on my laptop at least) by telling
dpkg-reconfigure to autodetect the monitor, and then keeping the options
following that the same.
andy.
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 01:01:03 UTC
Permalink
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James Takac
2007-12-02 23:56:36 UTC
Permalink
James,
Thanks for taking the time.
I tried to be careful to tell it to set up the new partition to 50% (moved
the slider almost all the way to the left). However, after it was done, I
think it reported that there was now only 8mb of free space on the Windows
partition.
When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD out, I don't get an initial
menu.
When I boot with the Ubuntu installation CD in, the menu is includes Start
Ubuntu, start in video safe mode, etc. I can change the video selections,
but they apparently don't get saved and doesn't change what? happens when I
reboot without the CD in.
After the splash Ubuntu screen, I see about four of the login screen
horizontally, and it goes down about 80% of the screen, with gibberish
underneath that. The screen has "untuubuntuubuntuubuntuub" going across,
with 4 logos, and a half username box, 3 username boxes, and another half
username box.
Laptop is a HP Pavilion zd7000. HP's site says the video card is nvidia
geforce 4. Don't know the exact model of the screen to put into the ubuntu
settings, but it's widescreen and 17".
So, how do I boot in video safe mode, change video settings, and then get
them to stick when I reboot without the CD? And, any idea which video
settings I should pick from the menu?
Thanks so much.
Hal Davis
I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.
Second, the Linux install didn't work until it reloaded using Video Safe
Mode (or something like that). Then, noticed that the bottom of my
screen wasn't being displayed, so if I moved the toolbar to the bottom,
I couldn't see it (but I was able to move the mouse down all the way,
right click, and access properties to move it somewhere else). Then,
like a genius, I thought I'd change the video selection to solve the
problem. I guess I was expecting the Windows-like temporary
installation, that requires me to tell it that it works before it's
really switched. But now, I can't read ANYTHING on the screen after the
initial Ubuntu logo.
Tried to figure out how to change the video (went online and looked at
help), and it gave me some scripts to run. Problem is, I don't know how
to run the scripts. The only DOS-like prompt I've been able to reach is
GRUB> and it doesn't like the text I input. I'm guessing that if I knew
how to get to the correct prompt the scripts would work fine.
Can someone tell me how to get my Linux system out of the ditch?
Thanks,
Hal Davis
Hi Hal
Your system should have a menu when you first boot unless you told it to
use the entire drive at which point windows would be gone. Assuming you
resized the partion windows was on via the install you should see a boot
menu. Just use the up and down arrows on the keyboard to navigate and enter
to select
As for the rest we need more info. What are the system specs, e.g. graphic
card, etc. Even if we know the laptop in question we might be able to look
up the specs online
Can you get to a terminal via CTRL-ALT-F1
You can think of that as a DOS prompt when you get there. It will ask you
to log in at that prompt first time you enter it
You also mention you can't read anything on the screen anymore. Fonts too
small? Blury,............ You don't give any detail
You mentioned changing video selection so I'm guessing you either changed
the default graphic card or you changed the resolution or refresh rate
James
Hi Hal

Forgot to mention. Best thing for a newbie to install nvidia drivers is likely
to be the envy script which can be found at

http://albertomilone.com/nvidia_scripts1.html

James
Hal Davis
2007-12-03 01:02:11 UTC
Permalink
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Wulfy
2007-12-03 02:01:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hal Davis
I grew up in DOS and Windows, but just getting started in Linux.
Installed Ubuntu 7.10, and had it set up a partition on my Windows laptop.
First, I don't know how to interrupt the boot process to tell it to load
Windows instead of Unix.
When you get past the BIOS screen, you should see at the top "Grub stage
1.5" or some such. Press the <Esc> key. You'll have a list of bootable
OSs. You can choose by using the arrow keys and <Enter> to select.

There are two choices for your Ubuntu install - regular and recovery
mode. It may be easier to fix your Ubuntu install in recovery mode
(it's like safe mode in windows).

I hope this helps... :@)
--
Blessings

Wulfmann

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