Discussion:
dual booting Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows 7
(too old to reply)
Gerhard Magnus
2013-05-26 21:25:02 UTC
Permalink
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.

I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the UEFI
standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought Windows
7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was to dual
boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past decade or so.
(I still need Windows because some people I collaborate with use
Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up with it.)

Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting, I
was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page. After shutting
down, I did, however, find entries on the BIOS boot menu for both
Microsoft and Ubuntu, and by changing the boot order I was able to boot
successfully back into Windows.

That was the last I saw of the Ubuntu installation for several days.
There was still no grub menu but now no reference to Ubuntu in the BIOS
boot list. And I could only boot into Windows 7.

Although interesting and/or incredibly time wasting, none of the threads
I traced on the Web offering solutions to this problem were useful in
getting the Ubuntu OS back, let alone in allowing me to dual boot Ubuntu
13.04 with Windows 7. The dual boot may even be impossible with this
post-2010 motherboard, fulfilling Microsoft's long-term agenda to block
Intel machines from running anything except Microsoft products. Those
people are so evil!

After a lot of hacking through the underbrush that got me nowhere,
here's what ultimately worked:
(1) Select "Try Ubuntu" with the 64-bit Desktop Installation CD and
connect to the Internet.
(2) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
(3) sudo apt-get update
(4) sudo apt-get install boot-repair
(5) Run boot-repair. Go to the "advanced" menu, and repair the MBR. This
is the crucial step.
(6) Install Ubuntu 13.04, being sure to use the option that erases the
entire disk.

I think Windows 7 keeps writing over information in the MBR to prevent
the installation of any other OS. What I did completely nuked my Windows
OS, but at least I was able to install Ubuntu 13.04.

One wonderful thing about computers and computer software is that what
little one knows is automatically leveraged into being able to do so
much more. I don't fully understand why this procedure worked (it's not
on the Web) and would appreciate any insights. I suspect the problem is
that the new DPT partitioning scheme uses the old-school Master Book
Record in very different ways. Can modern motherboards work with, let
alone boot from MBR-partitioned hard drives? Has anyone actually been
able to dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.04 on a new machine? (The
threads on the Web start out so bravely and then seem to peter out....)

The long-time dealer (Computek in Portland, OR) who sold me the box has
delivered superior, long-lasting products, and when components have
invariably failed I've gotten great service, even on obsolete machines.
Unfortunately, he adamantly does not "do Linux" and the best I can hope
from him would be to get me back to where I started. But I'd rather eat
the cost and use my Windows 7 disc as a coaster than go through this again!
Bahn, Nathan
2013-05-26 23:21:25 UTC
Permalink
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows
7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some post-2010
machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for someone having
similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the UEFI
standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought Windows 7
Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was to dual boot
Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past decade or so. (I still
need Windows because some people I collaborate with use Microsoft Word, and
LibreOffice has never quite caught up with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting, I was
booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page. After shutting down, I
did, however, find entries on the BIOS boot menu for both Microsoft and
Ubuntu, and by changing the boot order I was able to boot successfully back
into Windows.
That was the last I saw of the Ubuntu installation for several days. There
was still no grub menu but now no reference to Ubuntu in the BIOS boot list.
And I could only boot into Windows 7.
Although interesting and/or incredibly time wasting, none of the threads I
traced on the Web offering solutions to this problem were useful in getting
the Ubuntu OS back, let alone in allowing me to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 with
Windows 7. The dual boot may even be impossible with this post-2010
motherboard, fulfilling Microsoft's long-term agenda to block Intel machines
from running anything except Microsoft products. Those people are so evil!
After a lot of hacking through the underbrush that got me nowhere, here's
(1) Select "Try Ubuntu" with the 64-bit Desktop Installation CD and connect
to the Internet.
(2) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
(3) sudo apt-get update
(4) sudo apt-get install boot-repair
(5) Run boot-repair. Go to the "advanced" menu, and repair the MBR. This is
the crucial step.
(6) Install Ubuntu 13.04, being sure to use the option that erases the
entire disk.
I think Windows 7 keeps writing over information in the MBR to prevent the
installation of any other OS. What I did completely nuked my Windows OS, but
at least I was able to install Ubuntu 13.04.
One wonderful thing about computers and computer software is that what
little one knows is automatically leveraged into being able to do so much
more. I don't fully understand why this procedure worked (it's not on the
Web) and would appreciate any insights. I suspect the problem is that the
new DPT partitioning scheme uses the old-school Master Book Record in very
different ways. Can modern motherboards work with, let alone boot from
MBR-partitioned hard drives? Has anyone actually been able to dual boot
Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.04 on a new machine? (The threads on the Web start
out so bravely and then seem to peter out....)
The long-time dealer (Computek in Portland, OR) who sold me the box has
delivered superior, long-lasting products, and when components have
invariably failed I've gotten great service, even on obsolete machines.
Unfortunately, he adamantly does not "do Linux" and the best I can hope from
him would be to get me back to where I started. But I'd rather eat the cost
and use my Windows 7 disc as a coaster than go through this again!
G.M.--

Dunno if this'll help or not, but googling provided the below link.
Even though it's from 2009, I think that the basic concept will work.

http://lifehacker.com/5403100/dual+boot-windows-7-and-ubuntu-in-perfect-harmony

And here is something from last year -- HTH.

http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/05/17/how-to-dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7/

--
Please avoid sending me Word or PowerPoint attachments.
See http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/no-word-attachments.html ,
http://www.libreoffice.org/ &
http://www.fsf.org/campaigns/opendocument (Nathan Bahn)
Liam Proven
2013-05-27 00:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bahn, Nathan
G.M.--
Dunno if this'll help or not, but googling provided the below link.
Even though it's from 2009, I think that the basic concept will work.
http://lifehacker.com/5403100/dual+boot-windows-7-and-ubuntu-in-perfect-harmony
And here is something from last year -- HTH.
http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/05/17/how-to-dual-boot-ubuntu-12-04-and-windows-7/
From a very quick scan, neither of those seem to address the issues of
new hardware with EFI firmware, SecureBoot and GPT hard disks.


--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
Liam Proven
2013-05-27 00:11:40 UTC
Permalink
(I still need Windows because some people I collaborate with use Microsoft
Word,
You know, Word runs really well under WINE. It is one of the flagship
apps. I use Word 97 under WINE all the time myself but newer versions
work well too - I just happen to own a full licensed copy of Word 97 &
it does all I need and more.

Failing that, install VirtualBox, load Windows XP Mode for Windows 7
(a free download from Microsoft.com) into it - there are instructions
online - and run your copy of WinWord under actual Windows in seamless
mode on your Ubuntu desktop.

Needing Word is /not/ a reason to dual-boot - at least, not if you are
having problems dual-booting.

I do dual boot myself, but I never use my Windows installs except when
Ubuntu has gone badly wrong during a version upgrade or occasionally
to reflash a BIOS. I certainly don't use it to run MS Office - there's
no need.


--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
Basil Chupin
2013-05-27 04:54:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page. After
shutting down, I did, however, find entries on the BIOS boot menu for
both Microsoft and Ubuntu, and by changing the boot order I was able
to boot successfully back into Windows.
That was the last I saw of the Ubuntu installation for several days.
There was still no grub menu but now no reference to Ubuntu in the
BIOS boot list. And I could only boot into Windows 7.
Although interesting and/or incredibly time wasting, none of the
threads I traced on the Web offering solutions to this problem were
useful in getting the Ubuntu OS back, let alone in allowing me to dual
boot Ubuntu 13.04 with Windows 7. The dual boot may even be impossible
with this post-2010 motherboard, fulfilling Microsoft's long-term
agenda to block Intel machines from running anything except Microsoft
products. Those people are so evil!
After a lot of hacking through the underbrush that got me nowhere,
(1) Select "Try Ubuntu" with the 64-bit Desktop Installation CD and
connect to the Internet.
(2) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
(3) sudo apt-get update
(4) sudo apt-get install boot-repair
(5) Run boot-repair. Go to the "advanced" menu, and repair the MBR.
This is the crucial step.
(6) Install Ubuntu 13.04, being sure to use the option that erases the
entire disk.
I think Windows 7 keeps writing over information in the MBR to prevent
the installation of any other OS. What I did completely nuked my
Windows OS, but at least I was able to install Ubuntu 13.04.
One wonderful thing about computers and computer software is that what
little one knows is automatically leveraged into being able to do so
much more. I don't fully understand why this procedure worked (it's
not on the Web) and would appreciate any insights. I suspect the
problem is that the new DPT partitioning scheme uses the old-school
Master Book Record in very different ways. Can modern motherboards
work with, let alone boot from MBR-partitioned hard drives? Has anyone
actually been able to dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.04 on a new
machine? (The threads on the Web start out so bravely and then seem to
peter out....)
The long-time dealer (Computek in Portland, OR) who sold me the box
has delivered superior, long-lasting products, and when components
have invariably failed I've gotten great service, even on obsolete
machines. Unfortunately, he adamantly does not "do Linux" and the best
I can hope from him would be to get me back to where I started. But
I'd rather eat the cost and use my Windows 7 disc as a coaster than go
through this again!
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.

For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.

The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Ric Moore
2013-05-27 18:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page. After
shutting down, I did, however, find entries on the BIOS boot menu for
both Microsoft and Ubuntu, and by changing the boot order I was able
to boot successfully back into Windows.
That was the last I saw of the Ubuntu installation for several days.
There was still no grub menu but now no reference to Ubuntu in the
BIOS boot list. And I could only boot into Windows 7.
Although interesting and/or incredibly time wasting, none of the
threads I traced on the Web offering solutions to this problem were
useful in getting the Ubuntu OS back, let alone in allowing me to dual
boot Ubuntu 13.04 with Windows 7. The dual boot may even be impossible
with this post-2010 motherboard, fulfilling Microsoft's long-term
agenda to block Intel machines from running anything except Microsoft
products. Those people are so evil!
After a lot of hacking through the underbrush that got me nowhere,
(1) Select "Try Ubuntu" with the 64-bit Desktop Installation CD and
connect to the Internet.
(2) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
(3) sudo apt-get update
(4) sudo apt-get install boot-repair
(5) Run boot-repair. Go to the "advanced" menu, and repair the MBR.
This is the crucial step.
(6) Install Ubuntu 13.04, being sure to use the option that erases the
entire disk.
I think Windows 7 keeps writing over information in the MBR to prevent
the installation of any other OS. What I did completely nuked my
Windows OS, but at least I was able to install Ubuntu 13.04.
One wonderful thing about computers and computer software is that what
little one knows is automatically leveraged into being able to do so
much more. I don't fully understand why this procedure worked (it's
not on the Web) and would appreciate any insights. I suspect the
problem is that the new DPT partitioning scheme uses the old-school
Master Book Record in very different ways. Can modern motherboards
work with, let alone boot from MBR-partitioned hard drives? Has anyone
actually been able to dual boot Windows 7 and Ubuntu 13.04 on a new
machine? (The threads on the Web start out so bravely and then seem to
peter out....)
The long-time dealer (Computek in Portland, OR) who sold me the box
has delivered superior, long-lasting products, and when components
have invariably failed I've gotten great service, even on obsolete
machines. Unfortunately, he adamantly does not "do Linux" and the best
I can hope from him would be to get me back to where I started. But
I'd rather eat the cost and use my Windows 7 disc as a coaster than go
through this again!
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/Loading Image... /
Basil Chupin
2013-05-28 05:11:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
As the OP states above:

"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.

Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."


Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in
my case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my
wife's new computer arrived :-) .

Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than
the MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU


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Ric Moore
2013-05-28 08:38:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."
Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in
my case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my
wife's new computer arrived :-) .
Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than
the MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.
Yup, I quit thinking LONG AGO! Just let the installer do it's thing,
which always seems to work. I think the devs have it all figured out
better than I can. <grins> Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/https://linuxcounter.net/cert/44256.png /
Basil Chupin
2013-05-28 08:47:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon
restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."
Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in
my case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my
wife's new computer arrived :-) .
Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than
the MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.
Yup, I quit thinking LONG AGO! Just let the installer do it's thing,
which always seems to work. I think the devs have it all figured out
better than I can. <grins> Ric
LOL!

"I think the devs have it all figured out better than I can."

Which is why you use XFCE instead of Unity, right? :-D

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Ric Moore
2013-05-28 22:29:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."
Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in
my case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my
wife's new computer arrived :-) .
Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than
the MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.
Yup, I quit thinking LONG AGO! Just let the installer do it's thing,
which always seems to work. I think the devs have it all figured out
better than I can. <grins> Ric
LOL!
"I think the devs have it all figured out better than I can."
Which is why you use XFCE instead of Unity, right? :-D
Ha! I DO install standard Ubuntu first, play with it for 5 minutes (long
enough to install synaptic), and then install XFCE. If something goes
ape, then I have the "standard" to fall back to, you see? :) Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/https://linuxcounter.net/cert/44256.png /
Basil Chupin
2013-05-29 09:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always
been thataway. :) Ric
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."
Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in
my case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my
wife's new computer arrived :-) .
Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than
the MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.
Yup, I quit thinking LONG AGO! Just let the installer do it's thing,
which always seems to work. I think the devs have it all figured out
better than I can. <grins> Ric
LOL!
"I think the devs have it all figured out better than I can."
Which is why you use XFCE instead of Unity, right? :-D
Ha! I DO install standard Ubuntu first, play with it for 5 minutes
(long enough to install synaptic), and then install XFCE. If something
goes ape, then I have the "standard" to fall back to, you see? :) Ric
I see, I see, even though I heard very clearly, "I hollered, "Don't
look, Ethel!" But it was too late. She'd already been mooned." :-) .

If you were using openSUSE you wouldn't need to do what you do because
you can install xfce (amongst others) right at the beginning as the
preferred DE without having to go through the shenanigans which you do
now :-) .

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Tom H
2013-05-29 09:38:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Which is why you use XFCE instead of Unity, right? :-D
Ha! I DO install standard Ubuntu first, play with it for 5 minutes (long
enough to install synaptic), and then install XFCE. If something goes ape,
then I have the "standard" to fall back to, you see? :) Ric
If you were using openSUSE you wouldn't need to do what you do because you
can install xfce (amongst others) right at the beginning as the preferred DE
without having to go through the shenanigans which you do now :-) .
Just because Ric installs Ubuntu before installing XFCE, doesn't mean
that you can't install XFCE without installing Unity on Ubuntu just as
you can just install XFCE on Arch, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, OpenSUSE,
...
Ric Moore
2013-05-30 05:54:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom H
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
Which is why you use XFCE instead of Unity, right? :-D
Ha! I DO install standard Ubuntu first, play with it for 5 minutes (long
enough to install synaptic), and then install XFCE. If something goes ape,
then I have the "standard" to fall back to, you see? :) Ric
If you were using openSUSE you wouldn't need to do what you do because you
can install xfce (amongst others) right at the beginning as the preferred DE
without having to go through the shenanigans which you do now :-) .
Just because Ric installs Ubuntu before installing XFCE, doesn't mean
that you can't install XFCE without installing Unity on Ubuntu just as
you can just install XFCE on Arch, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, OpenSUSE,
Since 13.04 isn't exactly LTS, I figure using a "more standard" base
install will be somewhat more "solid". I can install every other desktop
I want, and still keep a base I would consider the most solid. But, with
12.04, I just installed Xubuntu straight up. With the latest version,
you lay down your money and place your bets. :) Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/https://linuxcounter.net/cert/44256.png /
Ric Moore
2013-05-30 03:01:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
If you were using openSUSE you wouldn't need to do what you do because
you can install xfce (amongst others) right at the beginning as the
preferred DE without having to go through the shenanigans which you do
now :-) .
True! But I prefer it this way. :) Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/https://linuxcounter.net/cert/44256.png /
Basil Chupin
2013-05-31 07:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Basil Chupin
If you were using openSUSE you wouldn't need to do what you do because
you can install xfce (amongst others) right at the beginning as the
preferred DE without having to go through the shenanigans which you do
now :-) .
True! But I prefer it this way. :) Ric
Your stamina in doing things the hard way must be admired :-) . I just
don't have the time anymore to fool around playing the game of "let's
see if this will work and what it may do..." :-)

BTW, I enjoyed listening to your theme song 8-) :



BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Liam Proven
2013-05-28 12:22:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.

--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
Gerhard Magnus
2013-05-28 13:22:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
--
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table

When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to be.

My original post on this matter probably included too much fdisk and
gparted data and was ignored -- so I simplified the story slightly
before posting again. Another mistake, as a detail I left out turned out
to be important.

The computer has TWO hard drives: the primary (1TB) and a solid state
secondary (180GB). I had the primary partitioned as 250GB and 750GB at
the shop and Windows 7 installed on the 250GB partition. My plan for
dual booting with Ubuntu 13.04 was to put "/" on the much faster
secondary drive and "/home" on the 250GB partition of the primary. This
made it necessary to use the "Something else" option on the installation
menu. I put the boot loader on /dev/sda (the old procedure for dual
booting.)

If I'd used either of the other two options -- "erase disk and install
Ubuntu" or "install Ubuntu alongside Windows" I think my initial attempt
at installing would have worked. I was finally successful after
this:

(1) Use a Live CD to install boot-repair and repair the MBR on the primary
(2) Install Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS) on the primary using the "erase disk and
install" option (which, as I mentioned, can handle the new GPT MBR
configuration in a way that is "transparent to the user")
(3) Use the Live CD and gparted to shrink the Xubuntu partition on the
primary down to 20GB and partition the remainder as ext4
(4) Install Ubuntu 13.04 with "/" on the secondary drive, "/home" on the
980GB partition of the primary, and the bootloader on the secondary
(/dev/sdb).

So I have Ubuntu 13.04 up and running (it's extremely fast) and an
Xubuntu to experiment with.

Maybe I can get Windows 7 to work if I install it on another hard drive
and make sure the installation doesn't go anywhere near the primary
drive that has Ubuntu on it! Or I may try one of Liam's suggestions as I
really don't like Microsoft.
Liam Proven
2013-05-28 14:23:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
--
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
I thought probably so, but with things like this, you really do have
to be super-careful.

IIRC, "DPT" was a maker of caching hard disk controllers way back when.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to be.
My original post on this matter probably included too much fdisk and gparted
data and was ignored -- so I simplified the story slightly before posting
again. Another mistake, as a detail I left out turned out to be important.
That is unfortunate.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
The computer has TWO hard drives: the primary (1TB) and a solid state
secondary (180GB).
OK, first, let me stop you there. These are SATA drives, I presume? (I
don't think there ever were EIDE drives as big as 1TB, nor SSDs.)

The terms "primary" and "secondary" don't really apply to SATA. This
is not nit-picking - I think that this is/was part of your problem.

With SATA, all drives are standalone. Sometimes, in the firmware, you
can set a boot order and tell the firmware to look at a particular
drive first, or even several drives in a sequence. The ports on the
motherboard are usually numbered, e.g. 1/2/3/4. Sometimes in the
firmware you can tell it that the boot sequence should be, say:

[1] optical drive
[2] SATA 3
[3] SATA 1
[4] USB

If you have/had your 1TB spinning disk on port #1 and the SSD on port
#2, and the firmware was set to boot from #1, then when you put GRUB
on disk #2, it would be ignored. I am taking an educated guess that
this is what happened. When you put GRUB on the SSD, you should also
have changed your firmware boot order to look at #2 before #1. If you
cannot do this, then you should have changed the drive connections so
that the SSD was on #1 and the HD on #2.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I had the primary partitioned as 250GB and 750GB at the
shop and Windows 7 installed on the 250GB partition. My plan for dual
booting with Ubuntu 13.04 was to put "/" on the much faster secondary drive
and "/home" on the 250GB partition of the primary. This made it necessary to
use the "Something else" option on the installation menu. I put the boot
loader on /dev/sda (the old procedure for dual booting.)
If I'd used either of the other two options -- "erase disk and install
Ubuntu" or "install Ubuntu alongside Windows" I think my initial attempt at
installing would have worked.
Possibly! I never like to trust the automatic options myself - I
prefer to trust my own decision-making.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I was finally successful after
(1) Use a Live CD to install boot-repair and repair the MBR on the primary
This is one of the problems I am having understanding what is going
on. In theory, a 1TB drive formatted with GPT does not /have/ an MBR.
GPT is an alternative to MBR.

If perhaps you mean "boot sector" or something like that, I am sorry
to quibble, but it is important to say so!
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(2) Install Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS) on the primary using the "erase disk and
install" option (which, as I mentioned, can handle the new GPT MBR
configuration in a way that is "transparent to the user")
Again, it is GPT /or/ MBR, as I understand it, not both.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(3) Use the Live CD and gparted to shrink the Xubuntu partition on the
primary down to 20GB and partition the remainder as ext4
(4) Install Ubuntu 13.04 with "/" on the secondary drive, "/home" on the
980GB partition of the primary, and the bootloader on the secondary
(/dev/sdb).
So I have Ubuntu 13.04 up and running (it's extremely fast) and an Xubuntu
to experiment with.
I am glad to hear it.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Maybe I can get Windows 7 to work if I install it on another hard drive and
make sure the installation doesn't go anywhere near the primary drive that
has Ubuntu on it! Or I may try one of Liam's suggestions as I really don't
like Microsoft.
Re-order the drives, make the SSD #1 - i.e. /dev/sda - and the HD #2 -
i.e. /dev/sdb. Check that the firmware boots from #1. Put the
bootloader on sda. Leave Windows on drive #2. Having the bootloader
and / on sda and Windows and /home on sdb should be fine.


--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
Christine Gipson
2013-05-28 14:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
--
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
I thought probably so, but with things like this, you really do have
to be super-careful.
IIRC, "DPT" was a maker of caching hard disk controllers way back when.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to
be.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
My original post on this matter probably included too much fdisk and
gparted
Post by Gerhard Magnus
data and was ignored -- so I simplified the story slightly before posting
again. Another mistake, as a detail I left out turned out to be
important.
That is unfortunate.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
The computer has TWO hard drives: the primary (1TB) and a solid state
secondary (180GB).
OK, first, let me stop you there. These are SATA drives, I presume? (I
don't think there ever were EIDE drives as big as 1TB, nor SSDs.)
The terms "primary" and "secondary" don't really apply to SATA. This
is not nit-picking - I think that this is/was part of your problem.
With SATA, all drives are standalone. Sometimes, in the firmware, you
can set a boot order and tell the firmware to look at a particular
drive first, or even several drives in a sequence. The ports on the
motherboard are usually numbered, e.g. 1/2/3/4. Sometimes in the
[1] optical drive
[2] SATA 3
[3] SATA 1
[4] USB
If you have/had your 1TB spinning disk on port #1 and the SSD on port
#2, and the firmware was set to boot from #1, then when you put GRUB
on disk #2, it would be ignored. I am taking an educated guess that
this is what happened. When you put GRUB on the SSD, you should also
have changed your firmware boot order to look at #2 before #1. If you
cannot do this, then you should have changed the drive connections so
that the SSD was on #1 and the HD on #2.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I had the primary partitioned as 250GB and 750GB at the
shop and Windows 7 installed on the 250GB partition. My plan for dual
booting with Ubuntu 13.04 was to put "/" on the much faster secondary
drive
Post by Gerhard Magnus
and "/home" on the 250GB partition of the primary. This made it
necessary to
Post by Gerhard Magnus
use the "Something else" option on the installation menu. I put the boot
loader on /dev/sda (the old procedure for dual booting.)
If I'd used either of the other two options -- "erase disk and install
Ubuntu" or "install Ubuntu alongside Windows" I think my initial attempt
at
Post by Gerhard Magnus
installing would have worked.
Possibly! I never like to trust the automatic options myself - I
prefer to trust my own decision-making.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I was finally successful after
(1) Use a Live CD to install boot-repair and repair the MBR on the
primary
This is one of the problems I am having understanding what is going
on. In theory, a 1TB drive formatted with GPT does not /have/ an MBR.
GPT is an alternative to MBR.
If perhaps you mean "boot sector" or something like that, I am sorry
to quibble, but it is important to say so!
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(2) Install Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS) on the primary using the "erase disk and
install" option (which, as I mentioned, can handle the new GPT MBR
configuration in a way that is "transparent to the user")
Again, it is GPT /or/ MBR, as I understand it, not both.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(3) Use the Live CD and gparted to shrink the Xubuntu partition on the
primary down to 20GB and partition the remainder as ext4
(4) Install Ubuntu 13.04 with "/" on the secondary drive, "/home" on the
980GB partition of the primary, and the bootloader on the secondary
(/dev/sdb).
So I have Ubuntu 13.04 up and running (it's extremely fast) and an
Xubuntu
Post by Gerhard Magnus
to experiment with.
I am glad to hear it.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Maybe I can get Windows 7 to work if I install it on another hard drive
and
Post by Gerhard Magnus
make sure the installation doesn't go anywhere near the primary drive
that
Post by Gerhard Magnus
has Ubuntu on it! Or I may try one of Liam's suggestions as I really
don't
Post by Gerhard Magnus
like Microsoft.
Re-order the drives, make the SSD #1 - i.e. /dev/sda - and the HD #2 -
i.e. /dev/sdb. Check that the firmware boots from #1. Put the
bootloader on sda. Leave Windows on drive #2. Having the bootloader
and / on sda and Windows and /home on sdb should be fine.
--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
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William Scott Lockwood III
2013-05-28 14:41:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Then you are in the wrong place. If you can't show us the simple
courtesy of not top posting, no one here is likely to want to help
you. Flagrant disregard for list rules and etiquette isn't going to
win you many friends, nor is calling what most of us do for a living
"Tech BS". I hate stalkers, but I dislike rude people who think
volunteers are their personal helpdesk even more.


--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Christine Gipson
2013-05-28 14:53:17 UTC
Permalink
Thank you. Nice to know that my pursuit of a simple solution to ridding
myself of a cyberstalker of more than 4 years duration that even law
enforcement has not been able to stop is more important to you than list
etiquette. The beatings I have repeatedly taken to the face (in the real
world) thank you as well.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
On May 28, 2013 10:41 AM, "William Scott Lockwood III" <vladinator at gmail.com>
Post by William Scott Lockwood III
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Then you are in the wrong place. If you can't show us the simple
courtesy of not top posting, no one here is likely to want to help
you. Flagrant disregard for list rules and etiquette isn't going to
win you many friends, nor is calling what most of us do for a living
"Tech BS". I hate stalkers, but I dislike rude people who think
volunteers are their personal helpdesk even more.
--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
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William Scott Lockwood III
2013-05-28 15:01:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christine Gipson
Thank you. Nice to know that my pursuit of a simple solution to ridding
myself of a cyberstalker of more than 4 years duration that even law
enforcement has not been able to stop is more important to you than list
etiquette. The beatings I have repeatedly taken to the face (in the real
world) thank you as well.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
On May 28, 2013 10:41 AM, "William Scott Lockwood III"
Post by William Scott Lockwood III
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Then you are in the wrong place. If you can't show us the simple
courtesy of not top posting, no one here is likely to want to help
you. Flagrant disregard for list rules and etiquette isn't going to
win you many friends, nor is calling what most of us do for a living
"Tech BS". I hate stalkers, but I dislike rude people who think
volunteers are their personal helpdesk even more.
--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
This isn't a place for you to handle what is clearly a law enforcement
problem. Perhaps if you'd stop being rude, and passive aggressive,
we'd help you. It sounds like your issues are deeper than what is
covered here on this list. If you want our help, then ask politely,
and follow the list rules. Simple. End of discussion.

--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Christine Gipson
2013-05-28 15:04:25 UTC
Permalink
You obviously are just like that stalker, a man with an incessant need for
control who chides a woman way too much in cyberspace for being a new user.
Nice to also see that the SMTP from my actual laptop is blocked when I go
to reply to you & I have to use my Android.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
On May 28, 2013 11:01 AM, "William Scott Lockwood III" <scott at guppylog.com>
Post by Christine Gipson
Thank you. Nice to know that my pursuit of a simple solution to ridding
myself of a cyberstalker of more than 4 years duration that even law
enforcement has not been able to stop is more important to you than list
etiquette. The beatings I have repeatedly taken to the face (in the real
world) thank you as well.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
On May 28, 2013 10:41 AM, "William Scott Lockwood III"
On Tue, May 28, 2013 at 9:35 AM, Christine Gipson <
29cagn1hnyc at gmail.com>
Post by Christine Gipson
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Then you are in the wrong place. If you can't show us the simple
courtesy of not top posting, no one here is likely to want to help
you. Flagrant disregard for list rules and etiquette isn't going to
win you many friends, nor is calling what most of us do for a living
"Tech BS". I hate stalkers, but I dislike rude people who think
volunteers are their personal helpdesk even more.
--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
This isn't a place for you to handle what is clearly a law enforcement
problem. Perhaps if you'd stop being rude, and passive aggressive,
we'd help you. It sounds like your issues are deeper than what is
covered here on this list. If you want our help, then ask politely,
and follow the list rules. Simple. End of discussion.
--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
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Jared Norris
2013-05-28 15:11:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christine Gipson
You obviously are just like that stalker, a man with an incessant need for
control who chides a woman way too much in cyberspace for being a new user.
Nice to also see that the SMTP from my actual laptop is blocked when I go
to reply to you & I have to use my Android.
Just to be clear, I am one of the mailing list moderators and I am
requesting that everyone please follow the list conventions. If you aren't
sure what they are we have a handy FAQ available [1].

For everyone involved can we please maintain the previous thread topic and
if you need more information regarding your cyberstalking request please
respond on the thread I created in line with the FAQ posted below.

Further replies on this thread need to be to Gerhard's issue. Thank you.

[1] https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuUsersListFAQ
--
Regards,

Jared Norris
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/JaredNorris
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William Scott Lockwood III
2013-05-28 15:11:11 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, May 28, 2013 at 10:04 AM, Christine Gipson
Post by Christine Gipson
You obviously are just like that stalker, a man with an incessant need for
control who chides a woman way too much in cyberspace for being a new user.
Nice to also see that the SMTP from my actual laptop is blocked when I go to
reply to you & I have to use my Android.
Lady, get some help. You are clearly disturbed. You don't know jack
shit about me, and I'll thank you not to continue with your bullshit.

I'd like a moderator to remove this troll now, please.

--
W. Scott Lockwood III
"There are four boxes to be used in defense of liberty: soap, ballot,
jury, and ammo. Please use in that order." -Ed Howdershelt (Author)
Ric Moore
2013-05-28 22:48:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
Sounds like you are asking for tech BS in a technical forum, as without
some real information, about all you will get is BS answers.

You have a gmail address. Use the double password feature they offer for
free, and no one will get into your email account, via google. It's a
heckuva feature. If you have a WiFi hub/router and your neighbor is
getting in through that, you need to up the security settings on it. Or,
use wires. That is as secure as you can get.

Next, call the police IF you are sure that someone is messing with you
(cyberstalking) for sure. That is what they are for. Jails are meant to
hold people like that, and if you do not report them, then someone else
will become victimized, due to your lack of reporting the offender.

It is on you, however, to insure that you have done all you can
security-wise on your end. Preserve your log files for evidence. If your
neighbor is accessing your WiFi network, without your permission, you do
have to inform them that you do not give them permission to do so. Fair
is fair. It's called being "Properly Assertive". :) Ric
--
My father, Victor Moore (Vic) used to say:
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/https://linuxcounter.net/cert/44256.png /
Christine Gipson
2013-05-29 08:20:33 UTC
Permalink
Thank you, Ric.
First, I have called law enforcement, but when the culprit I'd related to a
law enforcement officer, the blue code of silence goes into effect and your
would becomes one where people begin to be quite duplicitous with their
helpful abilities.

Second, I have even had problems on Google 2-step verification, having it
usurped via a duplicate device or remote access set up exactly as my cell
phone. I have no WiFi router, so not the problem. The problem is when my
son broadcasts his mobile hotspot from his cell phone and I use it to
connect. The culprit accesses via JS, etc., and just phishes the passwords
on data entry.

Also, living by the largest mosque in NYC and with Muslim neighbors means
the NYD wifi-sniffs right along with the same criminals who scooped all the
credit card numbers and codes in that $45 million dollar heist those
Dominicans did a couple of months ago.

I go for security anew daily. It is a constant battle in my neighborhood.
I thought Ubuntu would be a solution away from Windows. And actually, I am
not the one looking for the dual install at all. I am quite happy to ignore
Windows and use the Wine interface for the programs I require. When I see
my Windows compatible downloads for my LaCie external drive (which has my
art and photos from my 3 compromised previous laptops) have disappeared
from my system since last night, I know I was correct to call in ic3.gov to
counteract the copyright troll seeking to copyright my own works with the
Library of Congress before I do due to his/her accessibility to the
necessary funds to do so. It is pretty much a very black and white issue
to me.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
Sounds like you are asking for tech BS in a technical forum, as without
some real information, about all you will get is BS answers.
You have a gmail address. Use the double password feature they offer for
free, and no one will get into your email account, via google. It's a
heckuva feature. If you have a WiFi hub/router and your neighbor is getting
in through that, you need to up the security settings on it. Or, use wires.
That is as secure as you can get.
Next, call the police IF you are sure that someone is messing with you
(cyberstalking) for sure. That is what they are for. Jails are meant to
hold people like that, and if you do not report them, then someone else
will become victimized, due to your lack of reporting the offender.
It is on you, however, to insure that you have done all you can
security-wise on your end. Preserve your log files for evidence. If your
neighbor is accessing your WiFi network, without your permission, you do
have to inform them that you do not give them permission to do so. Fair is
fair. It's called being "Properly Assertive". :) Ric
--
"There are two Great Sins in the world...
..the Sin of Ignorance, and the Sin of Stupidity.
Only the former may be overcome." R.I.P. Dad.
/Loading Image...>/
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/**
mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users<https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users>
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Patrick Asselman
2013-05-29 09:33:54 UTC
Permalink
If you have tried new installs and did so on multiple devices, you have
to consider that the snooping does not happen on the device by means of
the network. There may have been an intruder in your house who placed a
small device between your keyboard and your computer, to snoop all
keystrokes. (If you have a wireless keyboard this device may be hidden
anywhere in your house.) There may be a pinpoint camera hidden in some
object, so the snooper can peek at your screen. There may be someone
across the street with a camera and a telelense snooping.

There may be private detective types out there who can help you with
things like that. They probably know what is available, how they would
approach this, and that makes them better suited to detect such devices.

Another thing to consider doing is taking a step away from the digital
world. If you have photos on a disk, store them on a usb stick and keep
it in your pocket. Print the pictures and store them in a bank vault.
Use your PC only for non-sensitive stuff, and realise that anything you
do on your PC will be compromised. (I.e. only use it for some simple
browsing etc).

Just my $0.02

Best regards,
Patrick Asselman
Post by Christine Gipson
Thank you, Ric.
First, I have called law enforcement, but when the culprit I'd
related to a law enforcement officer, the blue code of silence goes
into effect and your would becomes one where people begin to be quite
duplicitous with their helpful abilities.
Second, I have even had problems on Google 2-step verification,
having it usurped via a duplicate device or remote access set up
exactly as my cell phone. I have no WiFi router, so not the problem.
The problem is when my son broadcasts his mobile hotspot from his
cell
phone and I use it to connect.? The culprit accesses via JS, etc.,
and
just phishes the passwords on data entry.
Also, living by the largest mosque in NYC and with Muslim neighbors
means the NYD wifi-sniffs right along with the same criminals who
scooped all the credit card numbers and codes in that $45 million
dollar heist those Dominicans did a couple of months ago.
I go for security anew daily. It is a constant battle in my
neighborhood.? I thought Ubuntu would be a solution away from
Windows.? And actually, I am not the one looking for the dual install
at all. I am quite happy to ignore Windows and use the Wine interface
for the programs I require. When I see my Windows compatible
downloads
for my LaCie external drive (which has my art and photos from my 3
compromised previous laptops) have disappeared from my system since
last night, I know I was correct to call in ic3.gov [3] to counteract
the copyright troll seeking to copyright my own works with the
Library
of Congress before I do due to his/her accessibility to the necessary
funds to do so.? It is pretty much a very black and white issue to
me.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Ric Moore
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
Sounds like you are asking for tech BS in a technical forum, as
without some real information, about all you will get is BS answers.
You have a gmail address. Use the double password feature they offer
for free, and no one will get into your email account, via google.
It's a heckuva feature. If you have a WiFi hub/router and your
neighbor is getting in through that, you need to up the security
settings on it. Or, use wires. That is as secure as you can get.
Next, call the police IF you are sure that someone is messing with
you (cyberstalking) for sure. That is what they are for. Jails are
meant to hold people like that, and if you do not report them, then
someone else will become victimized, due to your lack of reporting the
offender.
It is on you, however, to insure that you have done all you can
security-wise on your end. Preserve your log files for evidence. If
your neighbor is accessing your WiFi network, without your permission,
you do have to inform them that you do not give them permission to do
so. Fair is fair. It's called being "Properly Assertive". :) Ric
Christine Gipson
2013-05-29 11:03:48 UTC
Permalink
Obviously something I already know ...
Still does not make using my LaCie external drive any easier when they
snatch the Windows interfaced software directly from my downloads file in
order to pirate my art and photos. Big business to Chinese, Russians, &
others.
The Patriot Act in the USA and DEA suspicions has been co-opted as an
excuse for installation of spyware and remote capable tech like installing
an old cell phone with Bluetooth capabilties inside desktops that are
offline to watch everything for a while. With the advent of cloud and Smart
Share technologies, it is even easier to be an amateur detective or
pirate/thief.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
If you have tried new installs and did so on multiple devices, you have to
consider that the snooping does not happen on the device by means of the
network. There may have been an intruder in your house who placed a small
device between your keyboard and your computer, to snoop all keystrokes.
(If you have a wireless keyboard this device may be hidden anywhere in your
house.) There may be a pinpoint camera hidden in some object, so the
snooper can peek at your screen. There may be someone across the street
with a camera and a telelense snooping.
There may be private detective types out there who can help you with
things like that. They probably know what is available, how they would
approach this, and that makes them better suited to detect such devices.
Another thing to consider doing is taking a step away from the digital
world. If you have photos on a disk, store them on a usb stick and keep it
in your pocket. Print the pictures and store them in a bank vault. Use your
PC only for non-sensitive stuff, and realise that anything you do on your
PC will be compromised. (I.e. only use it for some simple browsing etc).
Just my $0.02
Best regards,
Patrick Asselman
Post by Christine Gipson
Thank you, Ric.
First, I have called law enforcement, but when the culprit I'd
related to a law enforcement officer, the blue code of silence goes
into effect and your would becomes one where people begin to be quite
duplicitous with their helpful abilities.
Second, I have even had problems on Google 2-step verification,
having it usurped via a duplicate device or remote access set up
exactly as my cell phone. I have no WiFi router, so not the problem.
The problem is when my son broadcasts his mobile hotspot from his cell
phone and I use it to connect. The culprit accesses via JS, etc., and
just phishes the passwords on data entry.
Also, living by the largest mosque in NYC and with Muslim neighbors
means the NYD wifi-sniffs right along with the same criminals who
scooped all the credit card numbers and codes in that $45 million
dollar heist those Dominicans did a couple of months ago.
I go for security anew daily. It is a constant battle in my
neighborhood. I thought Ubuntu would be a solution away from
Windows. And actually, I am not the one looking for the dual install
at all. I am quite happy to ignore Windows and use the Wine interface
for the programs I require. When I see my Windows compatible downloads
for my LaCie external drive (which has my art and photos from my 3
compromised previous laptops) have disappeared from my system since
last night, I know I was correct to call in ic3.gov [3] to counteract
the copyright troll seeking to copyright my own works with the Library
of Congress before I do due to his/her accessibility to the necessary
funds to do so. It is pretty much a very black and white issue to me.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Christine Gipson
Look guys, I am not into the tech BS, just need to know how to get the
Post by Christine Gipson
cyberstalker off my machine and get some privacy. He is a real menace.
Sounds like you are asking for tech BS in a technical forum, as without
some real information, about all you will get is BS answers.
You have a gmail address. Use the double password feature they offer for
free, and no one will get into your email account, via google. It's a
heckuva feature. If you have a WiFi hub/router and your neighbor is getting
in through that, you need to up the security settings on it. Or, use wires.
That is as secure as you can get.
Next, call the police IF you are sure that someone is messing with you
(cyberstalking) for sure. That is what they are for. Jails are meant to
hold people like that, and if you do not report them, then someone else
will become victimized, due to your lack of reporting the offender.
It is on you, however, to insure that you have done all you can
security-wise on your end. Preserve your log files for evidence. If your
neighbor is accessing your WiFi network, without your permission, you do
have to inform them that you do not give them permission to do so. Fair is
fair. It's called being "Properly Assertive". :) Ric
--
ubuntu-users mailing list
ubuntu-users at lists.ubuntu.com
Modify settings or unsubscribe at: https://lists.ubuntu.com/**
mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users<https://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users>
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Gerhard Magnus
2013-05-28 15:26:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
--
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
I thought probably so, but with things like this, you really do have
to be super-careful.
IIRC, "DPT" was a maker of caching hard disk controllers way back when.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to be.
My original post on this matter probably included too much fdisk and gparted
data and was ignored -- so I simplified the story slightly before posting
again. Another mistake, as a detail I left out turned out to be important.
That is unfortunate.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
The computer has TWO hard drives: the primary (1TB) and a solid state
secondary (180GB).
OK, first, let me stop you there. These are SATA drives, I presume? (I
don't think there ever were EIDE drives as big as 1TB, nor SSDs.)
The terms "primary" and "secondary" don't really apply to SATA. This
is not nit-picking - I think that this is/was part of your problem.
With SATA, all drives are standalone. Sometimes, in the firmware, you
can set a boot order and tell the firmware to look at a particular
drive first, or even several drives in a sequence. The ports on the
motherboard are usually numbered, e.g. 1/2/3/4. Sometimes in the
[1] optical drive
[2] SATA 3
[3] SATA 1
[4] USB
If you have/had your 1TB spinning disk on port #1 and the SSD on port
#2, and the firmware was set to boot from #1, then when you put GRUB
on disk #2, it would be ignored. I am taking an educated guess that
this is what happened. When you put GRUB on the SSD, you should also
have changed your firmware boot order to look at #2 before #1. If you
cannot do this, then you should have changed the drive connections so
that the SSD was on #1 and the HD on #2.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I had the primary partitioned as 250GB and 750GB at the
shop and Windows 7 installed on the 250GB partition. My plan for dual
booting with Ubuntu 13.04 was to put "/" on the much faster secondary drive
and "/home" on the 250GB partition of the primary. This made it necessary to
use the "Something else" option on the installation menu. I put the boot
loader on /dev/sda (the old procedure for dual booting.)
If I'd used either of the other two options -- "erase disk and install
Ubuntu" or "install Ubuntu alongside Windows" I think my initial attempt at
installing would have worked.
Possibly! I never like to trust the automatic options myself - I
prefer to trust my own decision-making.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
I was finally successful after
(1) Use a Live CD to install boot-repair and repair the MBR on the primary
This is one of the problems I am having understanding what is going
on. In theory, a 1TB drive formatted with GPT does not /have/ an MBR.
GPT is an alternative to MBR.
If perhaps you mean "boot sector" or something like that, I am sorry
to quibble, but it is important to say so!
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(2) Install Xubuntu 12.04 (LTS) on the primary using the "erase disk and
install" option (which, as I mentioned, can handle the new GPT MBR
configuration in a way that is "transparent to the user")
Again, it is GPT /or/ MBR, as I understand it, not both.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
(3) Use the Live CD and gparted to shrink the Xubuntu partition on the
primary down to 20GB and partition the remainder as ext4
(4) Install Ubuntu 13.04 with "/" on the secondary drive, "/home" on the
980GB partition of the primary, and the bootloader on the secondary
(/dev/sdb).
So I have Ubuntu 13.04 up and running (it's extremely fast) and an Xubuntu
to experiment with.
I am glad to hear it.
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Maybe I can get Windows 7 to work if I install it on another hard drive and
make sure the installation doesn't go anywhere near the primary drive that
has Ubuntu on it! Or I may try one of Liam's suggestions as I really don't
like Microsoft.
Re-order the drives, make the SSD #1 - i.e. /dev/sda - and the HD #2 -
i.e. /dev/sdb. Check that the firmware boots from #1. Put the
bootloader on sda. Leave Windows on drive #2. Having the bootloader
and / on sda and Windows and /home on sdb should be fine.
Thanks for the information. This problem has been maddening and
time-consuming to hack through but I've learned a lot.

I don't understand the details of this GPT partitioning scheme and I
apologize for using the wrong terminology. This is the main reason why
"users" and IT people annoy each other so much -- users don't know the
jargon, or worse, insist -- sometimes vehemently! -- upon using it
incorrectly.

But I was dead in the water -- unable to boot anything but Windows and
then, after I nuked the Windows partition, unable to get anything
besides Windows error messages -- until I used the "repair MBR" option
-- and whatever it's doing -- from the "advanced" panel of the
boot-repair utility. It was the only way I could get rid of whatever
Windows was doing in the loading area of the disk on port 1 and then
install Xubuntu, etc..

Before I used boot-repair I tried re-installing Ubuntu with the
bootloader on the SSD and using the BIOS menu to point to that drive. I
think now that this didn't work because Windows still owned the loading
area on the SSD! (The shop formatted both drives as NTFS.)

I only speculate that I might have avoided these problems by using the
default "install alongside Windows" option from the start because I
think Ric used it successfully with his wife's computer. (BTW Ric,
Garmins are awesome!) I was lazy and didn't want to learn how to
re-partition an existing system on one drive to put / on a new drive
while leaving /home on the old one.

Here's the current gparted data (again, this setup works!) sda1 was
probably created when I ran the "repair MBR" option of boot-repair. As I
was unable to "repair MBR" on the SSD, sdb1 -- with its "mstres" flag --
is the last residue of Windows 7 on my system that prevents me from
booting from this disc.

Parti- File Mount Size Flags
tion System Point
----------------------------------------------
sda1 fat32 /boot/efi 94MB boot
sda2 ext4 18GB <--Xubuntu
sda3 swap 2GB
sda4 ext4 /home 910GB <--Ubuntu
sda5 swap 2GB

sdb1 unknown 128MB mstres
sdb2 ext4 168GB <--Ubuntu
unalo unallocated 2MB

sdb1 has a warning attached:
Unable to detect file system! Possible reasons are:
--The file system is damaged
--The file system is unknown to GParted
--There is no file system available (unformatted)
--The device entry /dev/sdb1 is missing

Here's what fdisk -l has to say:

Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 1 1953525167 976762583+ ee GPT

Disk /dev/sdb: 180.0 GB, 180045766656 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 21889 cylinders, total 351651888 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000
Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 1 351651887 175825943+ ee GPT
Basil Chupin
2013-05-28 15:45:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives.
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
--
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to be.
My original post on this matter probably included too much fdisk and
gparted data and was ignored -- so I simplified the story slightly
before posting again. Another mistake, as a detail I left out turned
out to be important.
[pruned]

Providing all details as accurately as possible makes solving problems a
heck of a lot easier :-) .

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Tom H
2013-05-28 16:11:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gerhard Magnus
Post by Liam Proven
Yeah, that is the problem. There is no such thing as DPT that I know of.
Sorry for the typo -- it's GPT, not DPT.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
When it comes to booting, things aren't quite as simple as they used to be.
I disagree.

If you're multi-booting with BIOS and an msdos label, you have to
worry about which OS installs its bootloader into the the MBR, whether
grub's core.img fits into the post-MBR gap, and updating the right
grub config when a kernel's upgraded.

If you're multi-booting with BIOS and a gpt label, you have to worry
about which OS installs its bootloader into the the MBR, creating a
bios_boot partition for core.img, and again updating the right grub
config when a kernel's upgraded.

If you're multi-booting with UEFI (and therefore a gpt label), you
have to set up entries to your OSs' boot executables, in the shared
EFI System Partition, in NVRAM via bootcfg/efibootmgr.
Christine Gipson
2013-05-28 14:19:39 UTC
Permalink
12.04 LTS installed on Subvert, but someone is attached to my OS via my
Thunderbird Mail & Ubuntu One. It I'd a neighbor, a real stalker menacing
my machines for his/her own gain and entertainment.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Gerhard Magnus
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and
Windows 7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some
post-2010 machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for
someone having similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was
to dual boot Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past
decade or so. (I still need Windows because some people I collaborate
with use Microsoft Word, and LibreOffice has never quite caught up
with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page.
[pruned]
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming
it's spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to
install Win first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always been
thataway. :) Ric
"I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the
UEFI standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought
Windows 7 Home Premium and had it installed at the shop.
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting,
I was booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page....."
Win 7 was already installed and he then installed 13.04 - just like in my
case where Win 7 was pre-installed and I installed openSUSE when my wife's
new computer arrived :-) .
Where the OP went wrong, I would speculate, was that when he installed
Ubuntu he chose to install the bootloader in another place other than the
MBR - which is why Win 7 boots but Ubuntu is not recognised.
BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
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Liam Proven
2013-05-28 14:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christine Gipson
12.04 LTS installed on Subvert, but someone is attached to my OS via my
Thunderbird Mail & Ubuntu One. It I'd a neighbor, a real stalker menacing my
machines for his/her own gain and entertainment.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Um. I do not understand your post.

Can you please fix the following problems:

[1] Do not hijack other people's threads. Start a new message to the list.

[2] Do not top-quote. Your reply goes /under/ the quoted text you are
replying to.

[3] Please try to explain yourself in more detail. I don't know what
"subvert" is, or how someone else can attach to your Thunderbird.

I'm guessing that "I'd" here is a smartphone typo for "is", if "LG
SPECTRUM" is a make of smartphone.


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Tom H
2013-05-28 11:52:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
I don't quite understand why you had such a hassle with dual-booting
with Windows 7 and your preferred version of LInux, Ubuntu, installed.
For Christmas I bought my wife a new computer (with an Intel mobo/cpu)
which came pre-installed with Windows 7.
The day it arrived I installed my preferred Linux distro (openSUSE),
after making some room for it by shrinking the Windows' partition, and I
can boot between the two systems with ease. (Windows, BTW, is only used
to update the files on the Garmin sat nav unit I have.)
I think the OP has experienced the age-old problem of Windows claiming it's
spot on the MBR as FIRST, if I'm reading correctly. You have to install Win
first, Linux second. Not the other way around. It's always been thataway. :)
As I said in an earlier email, there's no MBR when you use UEFI.

UEFI has an integrated boot manager that can be accessed at boot in
the same way that firmware's accessed on a BIOS system.

The UEFI boot manager allows you to choose a file to boot from on the
"EFI System Partition", "\EFI\...", which is a FAT partition that's
mounted at "/boot/efi" on Linux. The files that the boot manager loads
are in "/boot/efi/EFI/boot/", "/boot/efi/EFI/Microsoft/",
"/boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/"...

You can add/remove boot manager entries or define a default one with
bootcfg on Windows and efibootmgr on Linux.

For me, with both the 12.10 and 13.04 installers, the boot manager
defaulted to Ubuntu's grub. I've forgotten whether Windows was
automatically available in the grub menu or whether I had to add it.
Tom H
2013-05-27 07:03:03 UTC
Permalink
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows
7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some post-2010
machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for someone having
similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the UEFI
standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought Windows 7
Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was to dual boot
Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past decade or so. (I still
need Windows because some people I collaborate with use Microsoft Word, and
LibreOffice has never quite caught up with it.)
Back home, I was able to easily install Ubuntu 13.04. Upon restarting, I was
booted into Ubuntu without seeing a grub menu page. After shutting down, I
did, however, find entries on the BIOS boot menu for both Microsoft and
Ubuntu, and by changing the boot order I was able to boot successfully back
into Windows.
That was the last I saw of the Ubuntu installation for several days. There
was still no grub menu but now no reference to Ubuntu in the BIOS boot list.
And I could only boot into Windows 7.
Although interesting and/or incredibly time wasting, none of the threads I
traced on the Web offering solutions to this problem were useful in getting
the Ubuntu OS back, let alone in allowing me to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 with
Windows 7. The dual boot may even be impossible with this post-2010
motherboard, fulfilling Microsoft's long-term agenda to block Intel machines
from running anything except Microsoft products. Those people are so evil!
After a lot of hacking through the underbrush that got me nowhere, here's
(1) Select "Try Ubuntu" with the 64-bit Desktop Installation CD and connect
to the Internet.
(2) sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair
(3) sudo apt-get update
(4) sudo apt-get install boot-repair
(5) Run boot-repair. Go to the "advanced" menu, and repair the MBR. This is
the crucial step.
(6) Install Ubuntu 13.04, being sure to use the option that erases the
entire disk.
I think Windows 7 keeps writing over information in the MBR to prevent the
installation of any other OS. What I did completely nuked my Windows OS, but
at least I was able to install Ubuntu 13.04.
If you're using UEFI, there's no MBR!

If you're using UEFI, you can go into the firmware either right after
boot or from the grub menu ("System setup") and select Windows or
Ubuntu - unless you've deleted the UEFI boot entries from NVRAM. Once
in Ubuntu, you can fix grub to display both Windows and Ubuntu
options.

I've installed Ubuntu alongside both Win7 and Win8 (the latter with
SB) without a hitch.
Basil Chupin
2013-05-28 15:51:01 UTC
Permalink
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows
7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some post-2010
machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for someone having
similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the UEFI
standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought Windows 7
Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was to dual boot
Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past decade or so. (I still
need Windows because some people I collaborate with use Microsoft Word, and
LibreOffice has never quite caught up with it.)
[pruned]
If you're using UEFI, there's no MBR! If you're using UEFI, you can go
into the firmware either right after boot or from the grub menu
("System setup") and select Windows or Ubuntu - unless you've deleted
the UEFI boot entries from NVRAM. Once in Ubuntu, you can fix grub to
display both Windows and Ubuntu options. I've installed Ubuntu
alongside both Win7 and Win8 (the latter with SB) without a hitch.
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the
mobo has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to
function.

Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
staticsafe
2013-05-28 16:20:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Basil Chupin
This may be helpful to anyone trying to dual boot Ubuntu 13.04 and Windows
7, or even just to install Ubuntu 13.04 by itself on some post-2010
machines. At least the details will end up on the Web for someone having
similar problems.
I bought a new box with the Intel DB75EN motherboard that uses the UEFI
standard and DPT partitioning for the hard drives. I also bought Windows 7
Home Premium and had it installed at the shop. My plan was to dual boot
Windows and Linux as I have successfully for the past decade or so. (I still
need Windows because some people I collaborate with use Microsoft Word, and
LibreOffice has never quite caught up with it.)
[pruned]
If you're using UEFI, there's no MBR! If you're using UEFI, you
can go into the firmware either right after boot or from the grub
menu ("System setup") and select Windows or Ubuntu - unless you've
deleted the UEFI boot entries from NVRAM. Once in Ubuntu, you can
fix grub to display both Windows and Ubuntu options. I've
installed Ubuntu alongside both Win7 and Win8 (the latter with SB)
without a hitch.
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if
the mobo has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require
UEFI to function.
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is
turned off.
BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Windows 8 does not require UEFI. But if you want to use the "secure
boot" functionality you need UEFI. This is a rather confusing
topic so I'll post a quote from Wikipedia:

"Certified Windows 8 hardware will require secure boot. Soon after the
feature was announced, September 2011, it caused widespread fear it
would lock-out alternative operating systems.[11][12][13][14] In January
2012, Microsoft confirmed it would require hardware manufacturers to
enable secure boot on Windows 8 devices, and that x86/64 devices must
provide the option to turn it off while ARM-based devices must not
provide the option to turn it off.[15] According to Glyn Moody, at
ComputerWorld, this "approach seems to be making it hard if not
impossible to install GNU/Linux on hardware systems certified for
Windows 8"."

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secure_Boot#Secure_boot

See also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_8#Secure_boot
--
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Tom H
2013-05-28 16:25:54 UTC
Permalink
If you're using UEFI, there's no MBR! If you're using UEFI, you can go
into the firmware either right after boot or from the grub menu ("System
setup") and select Windows or Ubuntu - unless you've deleted the UEFI boot
entries from NVRAM. Once in Ubuntu, you can fix grub to display both Windows
and Ubuntu options. I've installed Ubuntu alongside both Win7 and Win8 (the
latter with SB) without a hitch.
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the mobo
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to function.
Neither win7 nor Win8 require UEFI.

Microsoft's Win8 certification requires UEFI with "Secure Boot".
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.
To be exact: you're using UEFI in legacy mode. :)
Basil Chupin
2013-05-31 07:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tom H
If you're using UEFI, there's no MBR! If you're using UEFI, you can go
into the firmware either right after boot or from the grub menu ("System
setup") and select Windows or Ubuntu - unless you've deleted the UEFI boot
entries from NVRAM. Once in Ubuntu, you can fix grub to display both Windows
and Ubuntu options. I've installed Ubuntu alongside both Win7 and Win8 (the
latter with SB) without a hitch.
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the mobo
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to function.
Neither win7 nor Win8 require UEFI.
Microsoft's Win8 certification requires UEFI with "Secure Boot".
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.
To be exact: you're using UEFI in legacy mode. :)
Whatever. All I said was that I installed my Linux distro which had in 7
pre-installed with no hassles of any description (apart from shrinking
the Windows partition to make room for openSUSE) :-)

BC
--
Using openSUSE 12.3, KDE 4.10.3 & kernel 3.9.4-1 on a system with-
AMD FX 8-core 3.6/4.2GHz processor
16GB PC14900/1866MHz Quad Channel Corsair "Vengeance" RAM
Gigabyte AMD3+ m/board; Gigabyte nVidia GTX550Ti 1GB DDR5 GPU
Liam Proven
2013-05-29 07:59:47 UTC
Permalink
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the mobo
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to function.
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.
You're wrong.

UEFI is a kind of motherboard firmware. It is a hardware feature. No
version of Windows or Linux *requires* it. Windows 7 and 8 both
support it natively; older versions require the UEFI to have legacy
BIOS emulation.

It is the norm on Itanium (IA64) systems. It is becoming normal with
x86-64 systems now. Part of this is that MS *require* system builders
to use it to get the marketing sticker that says "compatible with
Windows 8". This requires UEFI and its "Secure Boot feature" which
requires code-signing on OS boot loaders.

I personally think that this is anti-competitive behaviour by MS,
attempting to prevent vendors shipping Linux or users installing it.

It is only "required" for MS marketing & promotional purposes, nothing else.

--
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Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 ? Cell: +44 7939-087884
Tom H
2013-05-29 09:28:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Liam Proven
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the mobo
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to function.
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.
You're wrong.
UEFI is a kind of motherboard firmware. It is a hardware feature. No
version of Windows or Linux *requires* it. Windows 7 and 8 both
support it natively; older versions require the UEFI to have legacy
BIOS emulation.
It is the norm on Itanium (IA64) systems. It is becoming normal with
x86-64 systems now. Part of this is that MS *require* system builders
to use it to get the marketing sticker that says "compatible with
Windows 8". This requires UEFI and its "Secure Boot feature" which
requires code-signing on OS boot loaders.
I personally think that this is anti-competitive behaviour by MS,
attempting to prevent vendors shipping Linux or users installing it.
It is only "required" for MS marketing & promotional purposes, nothing else.
I seem to be permanently disagreeing with posters in this thread. :(

Secure Boot's purpose is to defeat bootkits. Whether it's a good
design and whether it'll resist attempts to break it is beyond my
level of expertise; I have to trust those involved in developing and
applying the specs are experts in this field and have done the
necessary.

If Secure Boot is a ploy to restrict competition, it's a pretty lame
one given how easy (from a user's perspective!) it is to use Linux
with Secure Boot enabled.
Avi Greenbury
2013-05-29 09:57:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Liam Proven
I personally think that this is anti-competitive behaviour by MS,
attempting to prevent vendors shipping Linux or users installing it.
MS don't seem to mind who gets signing keys signed by their vendor
program - Secure Boot is, largely, a solved problem.

UEFI, however, still seems to be horrendously inconsistently defined
and implemented, and restrictions aimed at preventing the installation
of other OSes tend to be implemented in bugs here (or simply in
licenses) rather than by anyone really making Secure Boot hard to get
around.
--
Avi
Christine Gipson
2013-05-29 11:06:38 UTC
Permalink
Not using Windows 8, but my Windows 8 beta download under the gmail
chrisie.echo4ever at gmail.com was stolen from my downloads folder in my
laptop on download... I have a clone.

sent from my LG SPECTRUM
Post by Liam Proven
Post by Basil Chupin
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if the
mobo
Post by Basil Chupin
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to function.
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is turned
off.
You're wrong.
UEFI is a kind of motherboard firmware. It is a hardware feature. No
version of Windows or Linux *requires* it. Windows 7 and 8 both
support it natively; older versions require the UEFI to have legacy
BIOS emulation.
It is the norm on Itanium (IA64) systems. It is becoming normal with
x86-64 systems now. Part of this is that MS *require* system builders
to use it to get the marketing sticker that says "compatible with
Windows 8". This requires UEFI and its "Secure Boot feature" which
requires code-signing on OS boot loaders.
I personally think that this is anti-competitive behaviour by MS,
attempting to prevent vendors shipping Linux or users installing it.
It is only "required" for MS marketing & promotional purposes, nothing else.
--
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Email: lproven at cix.co.uk ? GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com ? Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
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Gerhard Magnus
2013-05-29 13:13:13 UTC
Permalink
I can't believe you're trying to hijack this thread again!
Post by Christine Gipson
Not using Windows 8, but my Windows 8 beta download under the gmail
chrisie.echo4ever at gmail.com <mailto:chrisie.echo4ever at gmail.com> was
stolen from my downloads folder in my laptop on download... I have a clone.
sent from my LG SPECTRUM
On May 29, 2013 4:01 AM, "Liam Proven" <lproven at gmail.com
On 28 May 2013 16:51, Basil Chupin <blchupin at iinet.net.au
Post by Basil Chupin
Correct me if I am wrong but Win 7 does not require UEFI, even if
the mobo
Post by Basil Chupin
has UEFI; Win 8 on the other hand probably does require UEFI to
function.
Post by Basil Chupin
Both my computer and my wife's have UEFI motherboards but UEFI is
turned
Post by Basil Chupin
off.
You're wrong.
UEFI is a kind of motherboard firmware. It is a hardware feature. No
version of Windows or Linux *requires* it. Windows 7 and 8 both
support it natively; older versions require the UEFI to have legacy
BIOS emulation.
It is the norm on Itanium (IA64) systems. It is becoming normal with
x86-64 systems now. Part of this is that MS *require* system builders
to use it to get the marketing sticker that says "compatible with
Windows 8". This requires UEFI and its "Secure Boot feature" which
requires code-signing on OS boot loaders.
I personally think that this is anti-competitive behaviour by MS,
attempting to prevent vendors shipping Linux or users installing it.
It is only "required" for MS marketing & promotional purposes, nothing else.
--
Liam Proven ? Profile: http://lproven.livejournal.com/profile
Email: lproven at cix.co.uk <mailto:lproven at cix.co.uk> ?
GMail/G+/Twitter/Flickr/Facebook: lproven
MSN: lproven at hotmail.com <mailto:lproven at hotmail.com> ?
Skype/AIM/Yahoo/LinkedIn: liamproven
Tel: +44 20-8685-0498 <tel:%2B44%2020-8685-0498> ? Cell: +44
7939-087884 <tel:%2B44%207939-087884>
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